Natural History

Ralph Hollins carries out regular surveys of plants and wildlife in the cemeteries.  Rather than duplicate his work we have included a link to his website.

http://ralph-hollins.net/Cemeteries.htm

During our last work party (27th May 2015) we saw an impressive fresh specimen of Chicken of the Woods fungus (Laetiporus sulphureus) (pictured) on a yew stump near the New Lane gate. The fungus is also known as sulphur shelf, the chicken mushroom, or the chicken fungus because it is yellow and said to taste like chicken. It is claimed to be edible and can be prepared in most of the ways chicken meat can be used. As with any fungi, accurate identification is important if you are thinking of eating it.

Chicken of the woods 260515

Eating the mushroom can cause mild reactions in some people, such as swollen lips or in rare cases nausea, vomiting, dizziness and disorientation. Causes can range from allergies to the mushroom’s protein, to toxins absorbed by the mushroom from the wood it grows on (including yew) to eating specimens that have started to decay.

24th June 2015

5 Spot Burnet Moth

5 Spot Burnet Moth

Seen in the Dissenter’s Cemetery. This a sub species and is usually seen only between May and July.

Grey Squirrel

Grey Squirrel

Seen in a yew tree at New Lane.

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